All posts tagged: bcm111

Global Warming: The Melting of Media Credibility?

Climate change. I have also known about it and occasionally will hear about it, but that is where my knowledge ends. I had never knew that the issue was also heavily influenced by the media itself. For some of us, our opinions on such issues as climate change are ultimately shaped by the media’s coverage, often influenced heavily by politics and finances. So if the media says it is nothing to worry about, should we really worry? Currently, 97% of research and climate scientists, as well as every major institute of science agree that indeed global warming is happening and is continuing to increase due to human activity (Farrant, Holmes and Edwards, 2013). Media giants such as the New York Times and Al Jazeera however, do often provide great insights and research into the issue, with their ideas and arguments further being supported by interviews with elites in specialise fields and statistics. The UK Telegraph however seems to be more wary when reporting on climate change, publishing controversial and skeptical articles. They ultimately present man queries to …

Who Truly Counts In Global Media: The Value of Life

News is the very foundation by which society is able to find out information or events on local, national and international scales. Though it is surprising that as a Western society, our news broadcast focuses a lot of time and resources on events that only directly affect us. After this week’s lecture and having done some further research, I have since decided to focus on the idea of death on the news and in the media and the unsettling ideology that ‘all life is precious, sacred and equal, but as far as our media and politicians are concerned, some is more precious, sacred and equal than others’. This, I believe, is a great problem evident in contemporary global media and something which needs to be addressed. Stephen Romei, the Australian newspaper’s assistant editor, in charge of the foreign affairs pages, has written an article on what he terms ‘the cynical calculus’ of news values, arguing that how is it possible that ‘one Australian is worth five Americans, 20 Italians, 50 Japanese, 100 Russians and 1000 Africans’. Interestingly …

Investigating Television In Translation: Drama Focus

Sherlock Holmes has been distributed worldwide, being part of the public domain. As a result of this, Conan Doyle’s famous character has appeared in countless books, television shows and even Hollywood blockbusters and continues to pop up here and there! Now typically, many of the adaptations include the same characters, however cultural differences and variations have still been implemented. This is evident in the show inspired by Sherlock Holmes, ‘Elementary’. Set in New York City, a geographic alternation to the original tales, Sherlock Holmes (Jonny Lee Miller) resides as  recovering addict, and is being sponsored by his sober companion, Dr Joan Watson (Lucy Lui). It is this original relationship which eventually develops the connection between Holmes and Watson, with Watson ultimately becoming an apprentice of some sort to Holmes. It is interesting however, that Watson was chosen to be played by a female in this American adaptation. Within this relationship there is no sexual tension and more of a common understanding and respect, which seems to be admired by American audiences. Such a casting choice adds …

Comedy In Translation: Hahahaha! Wait…what?

Alright, look at moiye. Look at moiye. Laughter and comedy do often tend to bring people together, but only if both parties find what they are witnessing to be actually funny. It can be argued that comedy can only truly be successful when the actors are the right choices for the characters and if the audience actually understands the cultural contexts of the comedy. It is argued that comedy ‘plays an absolutely pivotal role in the construction of national identity, because it invites us to belong by sharing the joke’ (Turnball, 2008, p. 10). When looking at Australian comedy, no stars shine brighter than those of Kath and Kim. This Australian comedy has been perceived by most Australians as being hilarious, with the nation growing to love these two monstrous personalities. The humour and sarcasm of the show was widely accepted throughout Australian society. Australian viewers thoroughly enjoyed the irony of the show, though this was all lost in translation when the American version of Kath and Kim was aired. Karen Brooks ultimately argues that ‘the …

Media Capitals: Move Over USA.

What are our media capitals? Well, in our reading this week, Michael Curtain defines media capitals as ‘locations where complex forces and flows interact, they are neither bounded nor self-government entities’ (Curtin, 2003). Now with this definition in mind there was one country in particular which sprang to mind as being a leading country in relation to global media capitals – the United States of America. For myself, many of the television shows I enjoy are American, many of the global media entities that I know, watch or read are American and realistically this all makes sense with the worlds’  largest media cooperations being based within and around the USA. Though through more research and my growing understanding of the concept of globalisation, I now know that there are other international media capitals emerging, such as Hong Kong and India, both becoming key players in the distribution of media content worldwide. Furthermore Curtin explains that these media capitals are ‘places where things come together and, consequently, where the generation and circulation of new mass culture forms become possible’ (Curtin, …

To Hollywood & Beyond!

The film industry has always been the production of lights, glamour and stars, and for many of us no star shines brighter than that of Hollywood’s. Each year, tourists from all around the world flock to the sun-kissed west coast of America, in hope of either seeing the stars or becoming the next biggest hit themselves. For me, Hollywood has always been the epitome of the film industry, however it wasn’t until our most recent lecture I realised that this is not entirely true. Bollywood, Nollywood and even the emergence of Hong Kong and Bombay film industries have began taking the film world by storm. As globalisation continues to spread throughout our contemporary societies, the film industry too has been greatly affected. Such cultural hybridity is central to globalisation and is becoming increasingly evident within films around the globe, as other Eastern countries begin to ‘wrestle the control of global film from Western dominance’ (Schaefer, Karan, 2010). Indian culture in most recent years has also exerted a strong influence in some of Hollywood’s biggest blockbusters. This …

International Exchange: The University Dream or University Hunger Games?

University international exchange programs seem to truly offer the opportunity of a lifetime and it is continuing to grow, becoming Australia’s third largest export industry. Chances to make new friends, see new and exciting cultures and travelling the world are all promised and expected! So why wouldn’t students want to participate in such a vibrant and rewarding experience? Hoping to go on exchange next year to either the USA or Europe, I already have envisioned the positive experiences described above, but is this really the case for all students going on international exchange? As we pack up our bags and textbooks, jetting off around the globe, have we ever thought about what the experiences are like for students landing in Australia on exchange, entering our universities and hoping for the same colourful experiences? After looking into the reading by Peter Kell and Gillian Vogl, I began to understand that international students coming to Australia don’t just experience our sunny beaches or lovely weather. They are subject to language barriers, culture shocks, societal fears and other worries about security …

The World Is At Your Fingertips

In a society like our own, we are able to immerse ourselves into a huge variety of different cultures! The 21st century world now involves incredible interactions of new orders and intensity, opening so many windows and doors. Personally, I live a very Americanised lifestyle. I love American brands, the film industry, and ultimately the American dream. Meanwhile, I have friends who have been completely absorbed by the Japanese culture. Each of these experiences are unique and subject to the individual and I think it truly demonstrates just how connected our world has become! Such a utopian view of globalisation can be understood through looking at Marshall McLuhan‘s concept of the ‘global village’, in which it is argued that the world is able to be brought closer together through the globalisation of  connected communications. International interactions have grown to become so easy! Education, arts and ideas can be shared freely, with global events also now being able to be organised. Countries are no longer just subject to celebrating their own cultures heritage, but can now engage and …