All posts tagged: media

The Saviour: Anthropomorphism

Animals and humans have always had intricate relationships with one another. Since the beginning of time, animals and humans have worked along side each other, hunted one another and lived side by side with the other, so it is only natural to see animals present in the media within contemporary society. From the youngest years of our childhood, we are introduced to animals in the media. I for one, was obsessed with animals as a youngster. My favourite movies consisted of The Lion King, Dumbo and The Land Before Time, all of which were films based around animals. These films attempted to portray the natural world as a reflection of our own humanity, developing the concept of anthropomorphism. By giving these animals a human conscience and understanding of the world, we are opening up new doors to the way we feel towards animals and the way in which we understand their nature. There would not have been a dry eye in the cinema as Scar acted on his plan to murder Mufusa in front of Simba. Even …

We Are All In This Together: A Reflection

I have now been a blogger for a year and a half, though I can truly say that it wasn’t until this semester that I truly began to understand what it means to hold the title of ‘blogger’. I feel like our tutors have taken us under their wings to refine our skills and now we are being set free into the blogging world. Thank you master. I will try to make you proud. In all honesty though, I never truly realised the intricacies in the art of blogging. My blog layouts have always been simplistic. I love the colour white (I know, how boring) but to me, the colour white has always been so elegant and classic, elements which I hope will be evident in my future career. I also loved the professional layout of the premium blog that I purchased (I was a WordPress snob and succumb to the pressure to buy a theme, but I have no regrets). I was able to incorporate so many more widgets and customize my site more freely. …

Smile! You’ve Just Been Spotted!

Technologies have in most recent years successfully invaded and integrated themselves into contemporary social spaces. Audiences are constantly consuming information from laptops, mobiles and tablets and as it would appear would much rather converse to our friends in the screens, than the real and living people who surround us, which arises the question, are we anti-social or social? As technologically savvy as we have become, are we possibly redefining the traditional social and public space as ‘people make places, more than places make people’. I for one know that I always have my phone on me, even though I may be in a social space. If I am on the train heading into university, I will be texting my friends arranging where to meet and possibly even scrolling through my Instagram, uploading photos taken as the day goes on. However I am also often using the app snapchat, where I am able to send quick snapshots of photos I have taken accompanied with text and whilst the majority of the time, these snaps may be …

An Exploration Into the Capacity of … Um … Yeah …

Attention and distraction. As university students, never have we been so familiar with the two. One minute you are touch typing fantastic study notes, whilst reading the upcoming slides and acknowledging the lecturer. The next you are in another world. Most probably a digital one. Arranging to catch up with our friends after the lecture for a coffee, though where is the best place on campus for a coffee? Suddenly however you drift back into the surrounding of the lecture hall trying to catch up with what you have missed. The decrease of attention spans in younger generations is often credited to the rise in technologies. Now one would think that technology has made us brilliant multi-taskers though as Microsoft has researched, it appears that human attention spans have dropped below the level attributed to a goldfish. Previously, I had just thought that there was attention and distraction, however as Sohlberg and Mateer have suggested, attention can be understood in three different forms, these being sustained, selective and alternating. Sustained attention is more commonly referred to …

Ethno-huh?

Ethno-who? Ethno-what? Ethno-not-my-problem. As it turns out though, ethnography is my problem. As an aspiring journalist and communications and media student, ethnography lies at the heart of these communicative fields. Ethnography in its most simplest form is the study of how people see and make sense of the world (Northey, 2012). Here, as a researcher one is able to have the luxury of looking into thoughts, feelings and ideologies associated with particular audiences. Ethnography ultimately has such a profound significance, which is why it is so incredibly important to understand the stories and perceptions of audiences. Collaborative ethnography can be successfully used when analysing contemporary media through the collections and analysis’ of stories from people of different background and generations. It furthermore requires the researcher to actively work with the subjects through means of engagement (Lassiter, 2005). Interviewing my father last week about the introduction of television gave me understandings of his feelings and perceptions, which were also through later discussion, very similar to many other members of my family. As the interviewer, I was also even able …

I Bet You Thought You’d Seen The Last Of Me.

Well, I am back into it! I have finally finished my first week back at university and it feels so strange. I have spent the past month and a half travelling the world and now I am back into the world of blogging, but nonetheless I am motivated as ever! For the past 5 weeks Europe and New Zealand have been my playground and I have definitely had the time of my life, though travelling really put into perspective the significance that the media space has upon myself and my life. Whilst my trips were filled with laughter, amazing friendships and sleepless nights, they were also filled with various wifi battles! It is funny to see how quickly a friendship disintegrate when you find wifi access, though the connection is only strong enough for one person at a time. Social media generations have become so immersed into the online world that we feel that we must continue parts of our lives on platforms such as Facebook, Instagram and Snapchat. Seriously, give me mediocre wifi connection, my …

Who Truly Counts In Global Media: The Value of Life

News is the very foundation by which society is able to find out information or events on local, national and international scales. Though it is surprising that as a Western society, our news broadcast focuses a lot of time and resources on events that only directly affect us. After this week’s lecture and having done some further research, I have since decided to focus on the idea of death on the news and in the media and the unsettling ideology that ‘all life is precious, sacred and equal, but as far as our media and politicians are concerned, some is more precious, sacred and equal than others’. This, I believe, is a great problem evident in contemporary global media and something which needs to be addressed. Stephen Romei, the Australian newspaper’s assistant editor, in charge of the foreign affairs pages, has written an article on what he terms ‘the cynical calculus’ of news values, arguing that how is it possible that ‘one Australian is worth five Americans, 20 Italians, 50 Japanese, 100 Russians and 1000 Africans’. Interestingly …

Investigating Television In Translation: Drama Focus

Sherlock Holmes has been distributed worldwide, being part of the public domain. As a result of this, Conan Doyle’s famous character has appeared in countless books, television shows and even Hollywood blockbusters and continues to pop up here and there! Now typically, many of the adaptations include the same characters, however cultural differences and variations have still been implemented. This is evident in the show inspired by Sherlock Holmes, ‘Elementary’. Set in New York City, a geographic alternation to the original tales, Sherlock Holmes (Jonny Lee Miller) resides as  recovering addict, and is being sponsored by his sober companion, Dr Joan Watson (Lucy Lui). It is this original relationship which eventually develops the connection between Holmes and Watson, with Watson ultimately becoming an apprentice of some sort to Holmes. It is interesting however, that Watson was chosen to be played by a female in this American adaptation. Within this relationship there is no sexual tension and more of a common understanding and respect, which seems to be admired by American audiences. Such a casting choice adds …

Media Capitals: Move Over USA.

What are our media capitals? Well, in our reading this week, Michael Curtain defines media capitals as ‘locations where complex forces and flows interact, they are neither bounded nor self-government entities’ (Curtin, 2003). Now with this definition in mind there was one country in particular which sprang to mind as being a leading country in relation to global media capitals – the United States of America. For myself, many of the television shows I enjoy are American, many of the global media entities that I know, watch or read are American and realistically this all makes sense with the worlds’  largest media cooperations being based within and around the USA. Though through more research and my growing understanding of the concept of globalisation, I now know that there are other international media capitals emerging, such as Hong Kong and India, both becoming key players in the distribution of media content worldwide. Furthermore Curtin explains that these media capitals are ‘places where things come together and, consequently, where the generation and circulation of new mass culture forms become possible’ (Curtin, …