All posts tagged: Television

Internet: The Creator of Family Feuds, Communication & Narcissism

The internet. It is one of those technological advancements which either lights up the eyes and minds of younger generations or gives older generations the shakes. Why is this? How is it that two generations can exist within contemporary society and have completely contrasting ideas about the internet. Firstly, it is no surprise for you, my dear reader, to learn that the internet is everywhere. I mean, right now you are on my blog for university, reading a post. The internet has saturated every aspect of our lives from being social, to the way in which we are now being educated. It has ultimately became an extension of our very minds. I mean, when I don’t know a fact or figure, I instantly google for the answer and BAM – there it is! Returning home to talk to my Dad (Carl Stanbridge), Mum (Narelle Stanbridge) and sisters (Shannon and Aimee) I was eager to find out how they felt in regards to the internet as a whole and they ways in which they have access to …

Ethno-huh?

Ethno-who? Ethno-what? Ethno-not-my-problem. As it turns out though, ethnography is my problem. As an aspiring journalist and communications and media student, ethnography lies at the heart of these communicative fields. Ethnography in its most simplest form is the study of how people see and make sense of the world (Northey, 2012). Here, as a researcher one is able to have the luxury of looking into thoughts, feelings and ideologies associated with particular audiences. Ethnography ultimately has such a profound significance, which is why it is so incredibly important to understand the stories and perceptions of audiences. Collaborative ethnography can be successfully used when analysing contemporary media through the collections and analysis’ of stories from people of different background and generations. It furthermore requires the researcher to actively work with the subjects through means of engagement (Lassiter, 2005). Interviewing my father last week about the introduction of television gave me understandings of his feelings and perceptions, which were also through later discussion, very similar to many other members of my family. As the interviewer, I was also even able …

Through the Looking Glass: An Introduction to Television.

Imagine being present during the introduction of television into Australian society. Here is this grandiose invention, a new way of seeing the world. Would you be one to look through this new looking glass and fall into a new and modernising world? For my father, Carl Stanbridge, 50, the introduction of television into his life was something that he will always remember. It was in his family home in Thirroul, when my grandfather, Cyril Stanbridge brought home a television. Cyril, his wife and my grandmother, Penny, my father and his brother, Ross, all eagerly awaited the unveiling of this new television and in doing so, the revelation of this new era which they were entering in their lives. “The television that Dad brought home was a small box. We really couldn’t afford anything more, but it was a symbol of stability for us. We were able to own our very own television”. Whilst the introduction of television did not alter family routine, with my father and his brother continuing to play outside until the streetlights …

Investigating Television In Translation: Drama Focus

Sherlock Holmes has been distributed worldwide, being part of the public domain. As a result of this, Conan Doyle’s famous character has appeared in countless books, television shows and even Hollywood blockbusters and continues to pop up here and there! Now typically, many of the adaptations include the same characters, however cultural differences and variations have still been implemented. This is evident in the show inspired by Sherlock Holmes, ‘Elementary’. Set in New York City, a geographic alternation to the original tales, Sherlock Holmes (Jonny Lee Miller) resides as  recovering addict, and is being sponsored by his sober companion, Dr Joan Watson (Lucy Lui). It is this original relationship which eventually develops the connection between Holmes and Watson, with Watson ultimately becoming an apprentice of some sort to Holmes. It is interesting however, that Watson was chosen to be played by a female in this American adaptation. Within this relationship there is no sexual tension and more of a common understanding and respect, which seems to be admired by American audiences. Such a casting choice adds …